Last edited by Gukus
Friday, November 27, 2020 | History

6 edition of Jesus" Emotions in the Fourth Gospel found in the catalog.

Jesus" Emotions in the Fourth Gospel

Human or Divine? (Library of New Testament Studies)

by Stephen Voorwinde

  • 178 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published by T. & T. Clark Publishers .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Biblical studies, criticism & exegesis,
  • Books of the New Testament,
  • Religion,
  • Emotions,
  • Bible.,
  • Religious aspects,
  • Religion - Commentaries / Reference,
  • N.T.,
  • Criticism, interpretation, etc,
  • John,
  • Humanity,
  • Biblical Criticism & Interpretation - New Testament,
  • Biblical Studies - New Testament,
  • Bible - Study - New Testament,
  • Biblical Commentary - New Testament,
  • Christianity,
  • Jesus Christ,
  • Bible - Commentaries - New Testament

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages344
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7853819M
    ISBN 100567030261
    ISBN 109780567030269

    The third is about how Jesus walked on the water and about Peter’s attempt to do the same. Acts is Luke’s description of his gospel account. He says: In my former book, Theolophilus, I wrote about all that Jesus began to do and to teach, up until the day he was taken up to heaven.


Share this book
You might also like
Russian responses to transformation

Russian responses to transformation

self-perception of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

self-perception of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Episcopal Church in northern Texas, until 1895.

Episcopal Church in northern Texas, until 1895.

Late in the afternoon

Late in the afternoon

Current conditions in European telecommunications markets and implications for Non-European suppliers

Current conditions in European telecommunications markets and implications for Non-European suppliers

mourners chaplet

mourners chaplet

Need to reexamine some support costs which the U.S. provides to NATO

Need to reexamine some support costs which the U.S. provides to NATO

How Good Do We Have to Be ?

How Good Do We Have to Be ?

Georgian literary scene

Georgian literary scene

Jesus" Emotions in the Fourth Gospel by Stephen Voorwinde Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book seeks to discuss John's references to Jesus' emotions in the light of the current debate regarding Johannine Christology.

The Fourth Gospel refers to Jesus' love, joy, and zeal. At times it also portrays him as troubled, deeply moved, and in : About Jesus' Emotions in the Fourth Gospel.

This book seeks to discuss John's references to Jesus' emotions in the light of the current debate regarding Johannine Christology.

The Fourth Gospel refers to Jesus' love, joy, and zeal. At times it also portrays him as troubled, deeply moved, and in tears. This book seeks to discuss John's references to Jesus' emotions in the light of the current debate regarding Johannine Christology.

The Fourth Gospel refers to Jesus' love, joy, and zeal. At times it also portrays him as troubled, deeply moved, and in tears. Do these expressions of emotion underscore Jesus' humanity or his divinity?Format: Hardcover.

Library of New Testament Studies, Description: This book seeks to discuss John's references to Jesus' emotions in the light of the current debate regarding Johannine Christology.

The Fourth Gospel refers to Jesus' love, joy, and zeal. At times it also portrays him as troubled, deeply moved, and in tears. Jesus' Emotions in the Gospels investigates richness and variety of the emotional life of Jesus as depicted in the four gospels.

Attention is often paid to the events of Jesus' life, his teaching, and his ministry - but rarely is Jesus' emotional life by: 5. The Tears of Jesus. The book of Isaiah prophetically speaks of the Lord Jesus as “a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief” (). Three times in the New Testament there is the record of Jesus weeping.

Let us consider each of these. Jesus wept for friends. John poignantly states: “Jesus wept.”. This book seeks to discuss John's references to Jesus' emotions in the light of the current debate regarding Johannine Christology. The Fourth Gospel refers to Jesus' love, joy, and zeal.

At times it also portrays him as troubled, deeply moved, and in : Stephen Voorwinde. Description: This book seeks to discuss John's references to Jesus' emotions in the light of the current debate regarding Johannine Christology.

The Fourth Gospel refers to Jesus' love, joy, and zeal. At times it also portrays him as troubled, deeply moved, and in tears. Do these expressions of emotion underscore Jesus' humanity or his divinity.

Get this from a library. Jesus' emotions in the Fourth Gospel: human or divine?. [Stephen Voorwinde] -- This book seeks to discuss John's references to Jesus' emotions in the light of the current debate regarding Johannine Christology.

The Fourth Gospel refers to Jesus Emotions in the Fourth Gospel book love, joy, and zeal. At times it. This book seeks to discuss John's references to Jesus' emotions in the light of the current debate regarding Johannine Christology.

The Fourth Gospel refers to Jesus' love, joy, and zeal. 1) There is no way that the Fourth Gospel was written by John Zebedee or by any of the disciples of Jesus. The author of this book is not a single individual, but is at least three different writers/editors, who did their layered work over a period of 25 to 30 years.

Jesus also wept at the death of his friend Lazarus (John ). The letter to the Hebrews referes to Jesus shedding tears while praying in Gethsemane before his Passion (Heb ). Jesus Was Joyful and Happy and Enjoyed Celebrations. Jesus was joyful (John ) and certainly knew how to enjoy himself.

This book seeks to discuss John's references to Jesus' emotions in the light of the current debate regarding Johannine Christology. The Fourth Gospel refers to Jesus' love, joy, and zeal. At times it also portrays him as troubled, deeply moved, and Jesus Emotions in the Fourth Gospel book tears.

This book seeks to discuss John's references to Jesus' emotions in the light of the current debate regarding Johannine Christology. The Fourth Gospel refers to Jesus' love, joy, and zeal.

At times it also portrays him as troubled, deeply moved, and in tears. Do these expressions of emotion underscore Jesus' humanity or his divinity?Author: Stephen Voorwinde.

Biblical literature - Biblical literature - The fourth Gospel: The Gospel According to John: John is the last Gospel and, in many ways, different from the Synoptic Gospels.

The question in the Synoptic Gospels concerns the extent to which the divine reality broke into history in Jesus’ coming, and the answers are given in terms of the closeness of the new age. STEPHEN VOORWINDE, Jesus’ Emotions in the Fourth Gospel: Human or Divine.

(Library of New Testament Studies ; London: T&T Clark, ). xiii + £ This book, a revision of a doctoral thesis for the Australian College of Theology, is a. This slightly revised doctoral thesis, completed in for the Australian College of Theology under Rikki Watts and Johan Ferreira, sets out to make a contribution to the discussion of Johannine Christology by examining the references to Jesus’ emotions in the Fourth Gospel.

The thesis opens with a brie f description of “the current debate.”. Attention is often paid to the events of Jesus’ life, his teaching, and his ministry, but rarely is Jesus’ emotional life considered.

The emotional challenges posed throughout the New Testament gain new significance when understood side-by-side with the emotional character of Jesus. In this book, Voorwinde builds a careful picture of Jesus within the theological framework of each of the.

The book of Isaiah prophetically speaks of the Lord Jesus as “a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief” (). Three times in the New Testament there is the record of Jesus weeping.

Let us consider each of these. John poignantly states: “Jesus wept.” The Greek term for “wept” is dakruo, used only in this New Testament. Jesus was totally surrendered to His Father’s leading, and He trusted His Father to care for Him.

Think of the many times people sought to kill Jesus prior to His ultimate sacrifice. Satan would have loved to preempt our Lord’s sacrifice on the cross by having Him die another way. But Jesus knew His Father would protect Him.

The Gospel of John is the fourth of the canonical gospels. Like the other gospels it is anonymous, although it identifies an unnamed "disciple whom Jesus loved" as the source of its reached its final form around AD 90–, most likely within a "Johannine community", but the reconstruction of this community, and therefore the social, religious and historical context of the.

A couple of weeks ago, I came across the following monograph in the “new books” section at the S.E.B.T.S. library – "Jesus' Emotions in the Fourth Gospel: Human or Divine?" by Stephen Voorwinde. The work is a revision of the author’s dissertation at the Australian College of Theology.

There are approximately 24 specific, unique events where Jesus emotions are explicitly recorded for us in the gospels. Of those 24 instances, compassion is used 7 times, in comparison with sorrow (4), gratitude (4), anger (4), love (3), and joy (2).

5 of those 7 occurrences feature the term splanchnizomai, making it the most common term the. AUSTRALIAN BIBLICAL REVIEW ISSN BOOK REVIEW Published in Vol STEPHEN VOORWINDE, Jesus’ Emotions in the Gospels (London and New York: T&T Clark, ).

xiv + Hardback: £; paperback: £ This book is a welcome complement to Stephen Voorwinde’s previous volume, Jesus in the Fourth Gospel: Human or Divine. (London and New York:. Similar Items. Tending body, heart, mind & soul following Jesus in caring for ourselves / by: Gorman, Mary Jane, Published: () Behold the man: re-reading Gospels, re-humanizing Jesus / by: McCormick, Scott, Published: () The humanity of Jesus in.

The gospel writers paint their portraits of Jesus using a kaleidoscope of brilliant "emotional" colors. Jesus felt compassion; he was angry, Paul embodied the emotions of Jesus.

Delving deeply into the many layers of meaning within the “Gospel of Signs"--the first 11 chapters of the Fourth Gospel that describe seven of Jesus’s miracles--he shows how Mary’s teachings outline seven key steps for personal transformation and profound healing.

Jesus' Emotions in the Gospels investigates richness and variety of the emotional life of Jesus as depicted in the four gospels. Attention is often paid to the events of Jesus' life, his teaching, and his ministry - but rarely is Jesus' emotional life considered.

Stephen Voorwinde presents all sixty references to the emotions of Jesus as they appear in the gospels, enabling readers to think. This is Part 2 of a five part series.

You can read Part 1 here. To see and experience something of Jesus’ emotions, let us join eighty to a hundred thousand religious pilgrims on their trek to the sacred city to worship at the Jewish Temple. It is Passover.

1 The Jesus Narrative embedded in the Fourth Gospel 1. Introduction The failure of Jesus research according to Albert Schweitzer An inevitable shortcoming of all Life of Jesus literature seems to be that it is of a devotional – as opposed to critical – nature.

The Fourth Gospel Problem - part of a huge collection of works by G.R.S. Mead, including over a dozen complete books available online. Part of the Gnosis Archives, a comprehensive collection of materials dealing with Gnosis and Gnosticism, both ancient and modern.

The site includes the Gnostic Library, with the complete Nag Hammadi Library and a large collection of other primary Gnostic. is perhaps with regard to the purpose of any other NT book. Indeed, not a few scholars disregard the significance of altogether 7 Cf.

Schweitzer, The Quest of the Historical Jesus (New York: Macmillan, [orig. ])8 See above, n. 9 J. Robinson, "The New Look on the Fourth Gospel," SE 1. () Abstract. This slightly revised doctoral thesis, completed in for the Australian College of Theology under Rikki Watts and Johan Ferreira, sets out to make a contribution to the discussion of Johannine Christology by examining the references to Jesus’ emotions in the Fourth Gospel.

So, we will proceed to take a closer look at Lazarus, since the fourth gospel noted both his association with Jesus and the fact that he was “loved” by Jesus. A Sudden Appearance “Lord, behold, he whom thou lovest is sick” was the appeal of Martha and Mary (Fourth gospel b), and this reveals Jesus had this relationship with Lazarus.

Near the end of the book Farelly provides a concise summary of what his findings are intended to accomplish: “The Fourth Gospel’s intent is to nurture the faith and understanding of believers through its presentation of the person and work of Christ, and through a process of identification with the disciples who are themselves being.

The fact that most of the book is centered around Jesus' work on earth would also lead many to this distinction about the book. The similar relationships between the Fourth Gospel and the Synoptics are the accounts of the passion story, basic structural similarity with order of Jesus' ministry, and similar pattern of dialogues/metaphors (Dodd.

Jesus: A Pilgrimage begins with an introduction that clearly lays out what the book is and more importantly, what the book is not. I point this out because, I generally go in with preconceived notions of what I expect or want from a book.

Martin is quick to point out that this book is not a theological discussion on who Jesus is, nor is it a Bible commentary/5(). “The Lord did not set His love on you nor choose you because you were more in number than any of the peoples, for you were the fewest of all peoples, but because the Lord loved you and kept the oath which He swore to your forefathers, the Lord brought you out by a mighty hand and redeemed you from the house of slavery, from the hand of Pharaoh king of Egypt.

The Old Testament book of Job can be mysterious, exhausting, and frustrating. Yet, for millennia, readers have also drawn comfort and hope from the story of Job’s extreme suffering.

Bible Gateway interviewed Rev. Christopher Ash about his book, Job: The Wisdom of the Cross (Crossway, ). For those who are unfamiliar with it, briefly tell [ ].

First published inThe Elements of New Testament Greek has, over the years, established itself as the standard textbook for scholars and students of the Bible. The book is now reissued with a number of small revisions and additions, and a more substantial change concerning the recitation of the alphabet.

Otherwise, the aim of this perennially popular book remains as before: to present. Thus the theory of written sources behind the Fourth Gospel can explain many of the literary problems of the narrative.

The very first (2,18) and the very last use (20,30) of the word ‘sign’ in the gospel refer at least indirectly to Jesus’ resurrection, which would be at .'The Gospel According to St John' 1: 2. Approximate Date of the Gospel: 3.

Authorship in Tradition: 4. Internal Evidence: 5. The Johannine and the Synoptic Representation: 6. The Self-Dating of the Fourth Gospel: 7. Literary Structure of the Gospel: 8. The Making of the Fourth Gospel: 9. Then—And Now: Excursus.A gospel is a written account of the life and teaching of Jesus term originally means the Christian message itself, but in the 2nd century it came to be used also for the books in which the message was set out.

The four canonical gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John comprise the first four books of the New Testament of the Bible and were probably written between AD 66 and